Washington's STEM Talent Supply and Demand Dashboard

Dashboard

Data presented in the dashboards below displays data for Washington’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Talent Supply and Demand to help Washington track its progress in fueling a strong and vibrant economy in the state.

Current Indicators

Indicators Under Development

  • Indicator 4: Readiness For College-Level Study STEM Fields
  • Indicator 5: 21st Century Skills
  • Indicator 6: Effective STEM Teachers in PK-12
  • Indicator 7: Education leaders and teachers with STEM background
  • Indicator 10: State and local systems to support STEM success

Data definitions and methodologies can be found on the Data page


Indicator 1: STEM Awareness in Washington State

Key question: Are Washington residents aware of the term “STEM?”

Percentage of Washington residents indicating they have heard of the acronym STEM.

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Calculation: Percentage of Washington residents indicating “yes” they have heard of the acronym STEM at the time of the survey, out of a random telephone sample of voters in Washington.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of Washington STEM 20172015, and 2013 surveys (February 2017). 

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Indicator 2: Student Interest in STEM Fields

Key question:Are Washington high school students interested in pursuing majors that lead to STEM careers?

Percentage of Washington SAT test-takers indicating an intended college major in a STEM field

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Calculation: SAT test-takers indicating intended college major in a STEM field out of all SAT test-takers that indicated an intended college major.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of College Board SAT Suite of Assessments Annual Reports (October 2017)

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Indicator 3: Student STEM Achievements Among Early Learning—K-12

Key questions: Since success in education, particularly in STEM subjects, is affected by preparedness, including in early stages, what percentage of beginning elementary students are kindergarten ready? How many and what percentage of K–12 students are passing 5th grade math assessments? How are traditionally under-represented student populations faring?

Measure 1: Percentage of Students Entering Kindergarten Meeting the Math Readiness Standard

What you are looking at: Percentage of Pre-K students meeting the math readiness Standard on the Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS).

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Note: Comparisons between years are not accurate due to the increasing number and diversity of students taking the WaKIDS assessment.

Calculation: Number of students meeting standard for readiness in math on WaKIDS out of the number of students assessed for readiness in math on WaKIDS.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of OSPI Report Card (January 2018).

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Measure 2: Math Readiness in Grades 3 – 8

What you are looking at: The percentage of Washington students meeting math standard on the Smarter Balanced Assessment (SBA) out of all students who took the SBA for math.

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Calculation: Number of students meeting standard for math on Smarter Balanced Assessment for grades 3-8.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of OSPI Report Card  (November 2017).

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Indicator 4: Student Readiness For College-Level Study in STEM Fields

Key questions: Do students have real world/project learning and internship opportunities to experience career pathways? How well are we preparing Washington students academically to pursue STEM careers? How are traditionally under-represented student populations faring?

(note: measures 1 and 2 are currently in revision and displayed in the Development section of this page)

AP Computer Science Exam Pass Rate

The percentage of Washington students who took the AP Computer Science (AP-CS) exam and earned a passing score of 3 or above.

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What this means: As the number of students taking the AP-CS exam increases, the percentage of students passing has fluctuated. However it still remains above national average of 67% in 2017.

Calculation: Number of students passing with a score of 3 or higher in AP STEM subjects, out of the total number of students taking the exam.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of College Board AP Program Participation and Performance Data 2017prior reports (January 2018).

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Indicator 8: Graduates From Post-Secondary Institutions With Degrees in STEM Fields

Key questions: Are students graduating with certificates/degrees that employers value? How are traditionally under-represented student populations faring?

Awards Conferred by Washington Institutions by Major and Level

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Calculation:  Awards conferred to students completing programs at all Title-IV-participating institutions in Washington State by academic year.

Source: WSAC staff analysis of IPEDS Completions, survey A data from the U.S. Department of Education (September 2017).

For more detail on the degrees conferred by Washington’s public baccalaureate institutions, please visit ERDC’s Statewide Public Four-Year Dashboard 

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Indicator 9: Alignment of STEM Education Programs With Workforce Needs of Key Economic Sectors

Key question: Do we have an adequate supply of STEM trained workers in Washington State to meet the demand of employers

Computer Science and Engineering Gap Analysis for Bachelor’s and Advanced Degrees

What you are looking at: Supply of students expected to enter occupations and projected demand for workers in occupations.

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What this means: There are more projected annual openings for computer scientists than there are graduates in our state prepared to fill these jobs. The gap has been growing since 2006. In the 2016 skilled and educated workforce report there were 3,900 more projected to be openings for computer scientists than prepared graduates to take those jobs.

Calculation: Demand for workers in STEM occupations (growth and replacement openings) minus the supply of students expected to enter STEM selected occupations.

Sources: WSAC staff analysis of IPEDs and the American Community Survey, ESD, SIPP, and NSCG for the Skilled and Educated Workforce Report (October 2016)

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Indicators Under Development

Indicator 4: Student Readiness For College-Level Study in STEM Fields

Key questions: Do students have real world/project learning and internship opportunities to experience career pathways? How well are we preparing Washington students academically to pursue STEM careers? How are traditionally under-represented student populations faring?

Measure 1: AP Course Availability

Measure 2: AP Course Completion

Indicator 5: 21st Century Skills

Key questions: Change in STEM fields is rapid. What skills and knowledge best prepare students to adapt to changes and opportunities in a STEM workplace? Measure to be developed. Learn more here.

Indicator 6: Effective STEM Teachers in PK-12

Indicator 7: Education leaders and teachers with STEM background

Indicator 10: State and local systems to support STEM success

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Washington's STEM

STEM